Images in support of planning applications
Matthew Ward and Keith Collie have teamed up to supply a complete package of AVR images, Backplate, and HDR panoramas with relevant calculations to support architectural planning applications which use CAD, CGI and image based lighting.
 

Accurate Visual Representation (AVR)
It is possible to produce wide angle views which cannot be captured as a single image.  When the widest rectilinear lens in existence does not cover the field of view required, it is possible to seamlessly stitch images together.  It is important to know the angle of view for the stitched (or cropped) image. The Computer Generated Imaging (CGI) software needs viewing angle information and this is also required for an AVR statement. Supporting images with an overlay to show standardised angles of view can be supplied. Images are provided confirming the camera height and position along with measurements to relevant mapped points on the ground.
Angle of view calculations Savernack
National Gallery
National Gallery 40 degree view
 

Backplate
A backplate is an image of the existing terrain or buildings into which the proposed building can be rendered. High Resolution images are supplied with required information - lens height & offset, distance to subject or relevant mapped points, angle of view and equivalent 35mm camera data (occasionally needed by the CGI software). Surveyors poles and a 1m cube are incorporated in accompanying images allowing the CGI software to accurately construct the virtual camera angle.
Old Fire Station, Chiltern St W1 1 m cube
CGI by Martin Richardson of Bouncing Light Images
 

High Dynamic Range Images (HDRI) for image based lighting
HDR Environmental lighting maps are 360 by 180 degree panoramic images that capture a ‘map’ of the light illuminating the subject and contain accurate highlight and shadow detail - used by the CGI rendering software to produce ‘photo real’ images from CAD information using a process known as raytracing.
Chiltern St HDR Panorama
The full tonal range of a High Dynamic Range Image cannot be displayed on current computer monitors.  HDR images contain information in the deepest shadows and brightest highlights and when tone mapped into a Low dynamic Range (LDR) image for monitor viewing can appear to have unusual contrast and colour levels.
Savernack Interior

Matthew Ward

Keith Collie

 

T: 020 8673 9021

T: 01233 840 530

M: 07850 611 778

M: 07951 066 544